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How Allestree Woodlands performs against other schools

 

2014-2015

An analysis of all SEN performance against the national averages for 2014-2015 GCSE:

• National Standard SEN for 5A*-G  85% AWS SEN for 5 A*- G  97.5%

• AWS SEN for overall A* - C 60%

Allestree Woodlands is placed higher than the National Averages for all criteria of SEN

2013-2014

An analysis of all SEN performance against the national averages for 2013-2014 GCSE:

• National Standard SEN 5A* - C inc. Eng/Math 22% AWS SEN  for 5A* - C inc. Eng/Math 49%

• National Standard SEN for 5A*-G  85% AWS SEN for 5 A*- G  96%

 

 

 

What OFSTED (2014) say:

 

• The proportion of disabled students and those who have special educational needs supported at school action is above average, as is the proportion supported at school action plus or with a statement of special educational needs.

• The school has a specially resourced provision for students with a hearing impairment. This currently includes 14 students who attend intervention sessions for several hours each week. For the rest of the week, these students are taught alongside other students in the school.

• Disabled students and those who have special educational needs are very well supported by teachers and teaching assistants and have additional sessions in the ‘Hub’, a resource unit for all students who might need extra support. If strategies appear not to be working then they are changed. As a result, students at school action, school action plus or with a statement of additional needs are doing well and making good progress in relation to their starting points. The small number of students who speak English as an additional language are equally well supported to make good progress.

• Students in the hearing impaired unit are making good progress because of the quality of support they receive and their own hard work. There is a gap in the attainment of these students and others but the gap is narrowing each year. All these students make good progress from their different starting points.

• School leaders use the Year 7 catch-up funding to provide extra support in reading, writing and mathematics for small groups of students who start Year 7 with national curriculum grades which are below average. Students benefit from this group work and make rapid progress.

• Teaching assistants make a strong contribution to the quality of students’ learning. Their support for disabled students and those who have special educational needs ensures that these students are interested and motivated and able to make the same good progress as others.

• Students in the hearing impaired unit make good progress both in mainstream lessons and with their specialist teachers of the deaf. Teachers support the learning of these students by providing motivation and guidance, not by doing the work for them. Students and staff communicate with each other by sign language whenever necessary. All the students have individual teaching assistants who make sure that they are able to take full part in lessons across the school.

• A new special educational needs coordinator, who took up post in September 2013, has reviewed and improved all aspects of the school’s work for disabled students and those who have special educational needs. As a result, these students are making at least good progress

• Management of the hearing impaired unit is highly effective. Students are fully integrated into the mainstream of the school. A skilled team of teachers and teaching assistants fully support students in lessons across the school so that these students are able to make good progress. The gap between their attainment and that of other students has narrowed.